The Gates of Hell Turn 50

Ed Philp, with one last note before Andrew resumes his usual regularly-scheduled viewer service.

What should appear in my mailbox this morning, but a bizarre photocopied little treatise arguing that the twelve golden stars on the European flag symbolize the twelve gates to the underworld… Alternatively, according to the anonymous author of this tract, the stars represent the twelve stars of Maria’s crown. I couldn’t quite figure out whether he / she sees a deep Christian meaning in the EU, or a satanic cabal. In any event, the author is also quite upset about post-WM suggestions on how to recycle the masses of German flags that sprouted up.

This little screed is as good as the cheaply printed slip of paper I received a few months ago as a mailbox flyer advertising for a local lawyer who could assist with all of my immigration, tenancy, criminal and employment law issues. In all Eastern European languages, plus Russian, Turkish and "ponlisch". Assistance was also offered in white collar crime matters, also misspelled Wirtschaftsstafrect" in the flyer.

I wonder if a lawyer could respond to a negligence action against him by arguing that from his own advertising, it was prima facie evident that he had no special expertise in the area of law. "Practice it? Heck, I can’t even spell it!"

Thank you for putting up with me over the past week.

5 thoughts on “The Gates of Hell Turn 50

  1. Sorry – I’m brutally quick when it comes to recycling waste paper! Already disappeared. If I see another copy, I’ll try.

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  2. “Wirtschaftsstafrect” means “Wirtschaftsstrafrecht” in the well known Ponlish dialect, while “ponlisch” itself means “polnisch” in the Krakow area of Poland.

    Sorry.

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  3. Oliver, that’s ridiculous. Everyone knows that the Ponlisch dialect is referred to as mrzwyiciyzcm in that region. And I could make a joke here about Wirtschaftsstrafrecht being one of those terms for which there is simply no equivalent in ponlisch, but I will abstain.

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  4. ja ponlisch war schon früher benützt. In meiner Zeit wurde “Mangel /
    Shortage” als “Kartoffel- keinemehr- sind nicht” ausgesprochen.

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