Another Steyn Stillbirth

Mark Steyn’s daily dose of Europe-bashing takes up the debate in Germany over setting up places where overwhelmed mothers of newborn babies can abandon them. Steyn concludes:

Germany has one of the lowest fertility rates in Europe, net population loss, and a rapidly depopulating east that’s economically unsustainable. Thirty per cent of German women are childless, 40 per cent of female university graduates are childless, and its last election offered voters what Americans would regard as the statistically improbable choice of a childless man vs a childless woman. Meanwhile, the last gals in the country still in the procreation business have to be offered E-Z-trash drop-off bins in order to stop them tossing their bairns out the apartment window.

All this depravity and horror, Steyn gravely intones, makes it "harder not to conclude that parts of Europe are evolving into a kind of post-human society."

Man, that stings. I mean, you’ve got to sink pretty low as a society to offer mothers places where they can abandon their precious little newborn babies. Thank God America’s strong family values keep it from following Germany’s depraved lead. Except, of course, for those 40 naughty states that have already passed "secret safe place for newborns " acts basically identical to what Germany’s proposing. After a comparable outbreak of newborns being abandoned and strangled by desperate new mothers.

Oh, and by the way, Gerhard Schroeder has two children. They’re adopted, though, so perhaps that doesn’t count. Note to Monsieur Steyn: you can use the fact that they were adopted from Russia [cue threatening string glissandi] for your next juvenile crack! [Hat-tip, Ed Philp]

8 thoughts on “Another Steyn Stillbirth

  1. the statistically improbable choice of a childless man vs a childless woman

    What’s even more unlikely, the former got married four times.

  2. I’m not sure that is Steyn’s point, Andrew. It’s a chip shot to be sure, but he asks a good question – why are these women so desperate?

    That question is not original to Steyn – it was asked in the Times piece (which I read yesterday). I think it’s a good question to ask, but I also think it’s Germany’s business a lot more than it’s my business or Mark Steyn’s business, so Steyn is being a busybody.

    Then again, Germans seem to be some of the most active busybodies on the planet, so perhaps turnabout is fair play?

  3. It should be noted that it’s impossible for German mothers to get rid of their children when they give birth at the hospital. The so-called “baby hatches” operate on the border of legality. The American solution, which effectively legalises child abandonment, seems more enlightened to me.

    It should also be noted that American abortion laws are much more liberal than German ones; in particular, only first-trimester abortions are legal in Germany.

  4. “It should be noted that it’s impossible for German mothers to get rid of their children when they give birth at the hospital.”

    Does this mean that German mothers cannot surrender their children for adoption by another set of parents, Sebastian? That is mindboggling if true!

    “The American solution, which effectively legalises child abandonment, seems more enlightened to me.”

    I think the specific circumstances of such ‘abandonments’ determine whether it is illegal or not. The problem is that given the helplessness of an infant some abandonments can effectively be very close to attempted murder.

    If the infant is left in a place where it is likely to be found and cared for (such as a hospital or a convent or such) I cannot see any criminal intent. If the baby is wrapped in a trash bag and put in a dumpster or abandoned some place where it is likely to die of exposure before being found, that is much different. Even in these cases justice should be tempered with mercy because women who do such things are frequently under extreme pressure either from parents or boyfriends and thus not entirely in their right minds, I think.

    “in particular, only first-trimester abortions are legal in Germany.”

    This is surprising and may go a fiar way toward explaining some of the desperation.

    I hope Germans will decide to decriminalise mother’s abandoning children, at least in cases when the abandonment does not endanger the infant’s life.

  5. When it’s about Europe’s alleged or real “depravity and horror”, we could be served the views of the continent’s largest and, like it or not, arguably its most influential news magazine: “Paving the Way for a Muslim Parallel Society“. Then again, true to form, why not breast feed the readers from overseas on a Canadian’s sloppily researched rantings instead. I’m not sure about what a “chip shot” is, could this be one?

  6. Does this mean that German mothers cannot surrender their children for adoption by another set of parents, Sebastian?

    Not unilaterally 😉

    But yes, they have that possibility of course. But that’s a different matter – as far as I know they have to keep the child for several weeks unless they find someone to take it. In any case they’re known by name to the authorities. I think this deters many people.

    However, I’ve since read a bit more about it, and there are a lot of people who oppose the legalisation of abandoning children “into good hands,” and these people argue, among other things, that mothers who kill their children typically suffer from severe psychological conditions and are not likely to be affected by such a legal change. So take it with a grain of salt when I note the legal conditions regarding child abandonment and abortion. It may be altogether misleading to look for broad societal causes for infanticide; the number of cases is small and probably differ wildly with regard to the detailed circumstances.

    When it’s about Europe’s alleged or real “depravity and horror”, we could be served the views of the continent’s largest and, like it or not, arguably its most influential news magazine: “Paving the Way for a Muslim Parallel Society”. Then again, true to form, why not breast feed the readers from overseas on a Canadian’s sloppily researched rantings instead.

    Heaven forbid we talk about something else than Marek’s favourite subject matter for a minute. Has anyone ever noticed what a moral failure it is that our German radio stations broadcast weather forecasts every hour? Time spent chatting about the weather is time not spent talking about MUSLIMS.

    Get a LiveJournal so I can not read it, man.

  7. Well Marek, while I usually have a real and stern interest in your “rantings”, in this case I think Sebastian is right: the topic of integration or non-integration is surely an interesting and important one for Europe and Germany right now, but there is no reason at all to write about nothing else anymore. I come here to find Andrews view on the country I live in in all its different aspects.

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