9 thoughts on “Landliebe Cream Pudding is Ambrosia

  1. It is delicious. I eat at least three a week, often chased with a Müllermilch Schokolade. The closest thing the Teutons have developed to a milkshake. Next sensational new product in Germany – a glass of Würzelbier with vanilla ice cream in it. My patent…

  2. No, I’m a goth.
    Seriously though, “teutonic = deutsch” is wrong. As is “german = germanisch”, those words simply have a different meaning. Try asking any english native speaker about his Handy or Notebook. 😉
    For more info read the discussion page of the english wiki article on the Teutonic Knights or compare the definitions of “teuton” and “deutsch”. (Actually they would mean the same TO THE TEUTONS, but since most of us arn’t teutons – they left germany a looong time ago – it’s meaning is different in high german.)

    And btw: your example is tautological, since it is using what you are trying to proof as proof.

  3. PS. With “it’s meaning is different in high german.” I refer to “deutsch” in contrast to the teutonic meaning of the word “teutonic”. Oh well, I believe I obfuscated it even more just now…

  4. PPS It actually should read “in modern languages” or sth. like that, since it might not be so clear why the modern german definition would have any impact on the english one, sorry.

  5. And I don’t talk about our heritage. We talk about language and the english call us teutons (and Huns and Krauts etc) and they call the “Holländer” dutch. Just like we call them Angelsachsen (or something not so nice, if you catch my drift) sometimes which isn’t 100% correct either. My point is it is just a name and everybody knows what they mean.

    P.S.: Wahren es nicht die Ostgoten die nach Iberia eingewandert sind?

  6. @Aljoscha:

    Seriously though, “teutonic = deutsch” is wrong. As is “german = germanisch”, those words simply have a different meaning. Try asking any english native speaker about his Handy or Notebook. 😉

    Why don’t you ask an “english native speaker” to look it up in his english native dictionary?

    Teuton […] 2 : a member of a people speaking a language of the Germanic branch of the Indo-European language family; especially : GERMAN

  7. Actually, it is bitterly difficult to find a proper milkshake in Germany. North American ice cream still tends to use milk as its base (the major exception being large fast food chains, which employ an edible-oil-based milk product which apparently reduces ice crystals forming, and increases ‘smoothness’). Most commercial European ice creams have that same edible oil basis. You can see it in the separation when inexpensive oil-based ice cream melts. That just doesn’t produce the same type of milkshake. Of course I’m not referring to the handmade Italian ice cream parlor type, which is better than most anything found in North America. But most milkshake places don’t use that.

    And, a good North American milkshake uses about 2/3 ice cream and 1/3 milk, and then blends for a long time, often with a bit of syrup. The German proportions seem to be reversed. But please do suggest places that do a better job…

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