Renewable and Uninterrupted

Researchers at the University of Kassel are testing a plant architecture that would provide uninterrupted power from 100%-renewable energy sources:

Germany gets about 8 percent of its energy from renewable sources, a share which is projected to increase steadily over the next few years.

7 thoughts on “Renewable and Uninterrupted

  1. I can see how the philosophers around here come to like this report, as it is completely devoid of any numbers, which they are so allergic to. Such as numbers that show whether biomass production, which judging from the large green portion on their computer screen seems to provide the bulk of their energy, can be scaled up to national scale. And whether it still can do that when leaving out artificial fertilizers, themselves fossil fuel based, but including the impact of climate change on agriculture in the picture that is projected to put a lot of pressure on crops. But no, we link to an article that derides solar panel as “self-concious” and prefers discussing how the “enameled glass panels reflect the color of the sky” over naming the precise amount of CO2 per person per year that the building emits, don’t we?Dear Andrew, for your well-being I sincerely hope that you will still find a society in the future that is willing to do the hard work for you and take responsibility for all the cold facts of reality in life so that you can go off and fraternize with J. Habermas.

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  2. It’s funny to see someone who spends a good amount of time twisting and spinning any given subject into an opportunity to spout bile about Germany or Germans (anything remotely to related to Germany, really, including masturbating architects), it’s funny to see that same person constantly lecturing other people about getting a life or facing the reality of life.

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  3. @James & Co.,if you think I don’t have a point, why not leave kindergarten-style ad hominem attacks behind and take the adult route of showing how my concerns over the scalability of biomass production aren’t valid for this or that obvious or non-obvious reason? Or to put it in even more laymens’ terms, supposing that you still want to live in Germany or a similar country 30 from now, do you want to be having to choose between flicking a light switch or stuffing a potato into your mouth, and how do you want to avoid that?As for the atrocity that is the University of Bochum and 10,000 other buildings like that, you also still 100% entitled to provide a more plausible explanation. So?

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  4. @martin:

    if you think I don’t have a point, why not leave kindergarten-style ad hominem attacks behind and take the adult route of showing how my concerns over the scalability of biomass production aren’t valid for this or that obvious or non-obvious reason?

    Hey, nobody said that your concerns aren’t valid or that you don’t have a point. I, for one, am just once more surprised how you manage to be insufferable about the most mundane things, like the “scalability of biomass production.”

    In any event your point is difficult to answer, as it is ludicrous to think that biomass will ever provide “the bulk” of Germany’s electrical energy. It will probably be more like one tenth, at most (currently I think it is around 1 percent). It does, however, play an important role because it is independent of day-to-day changes in environmental conditions, unlike wind and solar energy; I understand this was the main point of the film.

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  5. @SebastianMy grandma doesn’t understand all those mundane concerns either. She gets her electricity from the outlet in the wall.

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  6. @martin:

    My grandma doesn’t understand all those mundane concerns either.

    The word “either” is misplaced – you are, as usual, the only one who doesn’t understand anything, least of all German renewable energy policy. I would bet that you didn’t know Germany even had a renewable energy policy before you saw this film. In fact scientists and government officials in Germany, like in most European countries, have been thinkking about these issues for years now. If I thought you had any actual interest in the subject matter, I would even link you to some resources, but I don’t.

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