Sir, Please Open the Folder “Juggzz”

This I didn’t know:

Last month a US court ruled that border agents can search your laptop, or any other electronic device, when you’re entering the country. They can take your computer and download its entire contents, or keep it for several days. Customs and Border Patrol has not published any rules regarding this practice,…

But the US is not alone. British customs agents search laptops for pornography. And there are reports on the internet of this sort of thing happening at other borders, too. You might not like it, but it’s a fact. So how do you protect yourself?

The article contains further tips on how to protect yourself, but they’re not exactly easy.  Consider yourself warned.

5 thoughts on “Sir, Please Open the Folder “Juggzz”

  1. Well, Truecrypt is rather easy. Just install, choose a password and encrypt your system. This is also a good weapon against thiefs and nosy colleges etc. Everyone should encrypt his/her data, you never know what “interesting” files you’ve got on your laptop.

  2. The Brits are death on child pornagraphy. A few years ago they sent ‘glam’ rocker Garry Glitter to jail for having child porn on his laptop – he was caught when he took it to PC World for some service and a nosy PC tech peeked at what was on the hard drive.

    It’s good advice, particularly the bit about using USB drives or even camara memory cards for sensitive data, because these are easily hidden. Use encryption on these devices and you are doubly-protected.

    I think it’s a dicy area from a civil liberties standpoint, or even from a legal standpoint. Child porn and ‘snuff flicks’ are illegal for good reason. But what about ‘synthetic’ child porn or snuff content? That is content mimicking child porn or snuff flicks – but purely computer-generated with no actual link with a suffering human being.

    It’s technically possible to create such things – should it be illegal? I could argue that it’s tasteless & am not personally attracted at all – but do I have any right to impose my views upon other people in the form of censorship or criminalizing such synthetic content? Probably not……

  3. The Brits are death on child pornagraphy. A few years ago they sent ‘glam’ rocker Garry Glitter to jail for having child porn on his laptop – he was caught when he took it to PC World for some service and a nosy PC tech peeked at what was on the hard drive.

    It’s good advice, particularly the bit about using USB drives or even camara memory cards for sensitive data, because these are easily hidden. Use encryption on these devices and you are doubly-protected.

    I think it’s a dicy area from a civil liberties standpoint, or even from a legal standpoint. Child porn and ‘snuff flicks’ are illegal for good reason. But what about ‘synthetic’ child porn or snuff content? That is content mimicking child porn or snuff flicks – but purely computer-generated with no actual link with a suffering human being.

    It’s technically possible to create such things – should it be illegal? I could argue that it’s tasteless & am not personally attracted at all – but do I have any right to impose my views upon other people in the form of censorship or criminalizing such synthetic content? Probably not……

  4. If searches on someone’s laptop without the slightest grounds for suspicion are legal then the same should be true for arbitrary searches in people’s homes. Officers might as well just enter anyone’s home forcibly, go through all their belongings, paperwork, letters, photographs etc. and take away whatever they are interested in – where’s the difference? I can hardly believe that this behaviour is considered legal in a democratic country with the “rule of law”.

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