“Ich muss die Pick-up erst mal greasen”*

Mr. Hamburger Sign

Spiegel [h/t LMGP] goes (g) to the gorgeous Hill Country of Central Texas, where about 10,000 old Teutonotexans still speak a kind of curious, antiquated German planted by Central European immigrants who settled there in the mid-19th century. They've also preserved other jewels in the crown of Germany's cultural heritage, such as the beer, the sausage, the "shooting festivals," and the Volksmusik! (German Joys berichtete).

* Why on earth is it "die Pick-up"?

[Photo: Hamburger shop sign, Caldwell, Texas, September 2004]

20 thoughts on ““Ich muss die Pick-up erst mal greasen”*

  1. “* Why on earth is it “die Pick-up”?”

    humm I´ll play it by ear: perhaps the most similar article in german to the “the”, would be “die”, that´s why they´ve chosen “die”.

    On the semantic level: we say “a picape” in brazilian portuguese. I do not know why is like this, but, anyway “a” is as feminim as “die”.

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  2. “* Why on earth is it “die Pick-up”?”

    humm I´ll play it by ear: perhaps the most similar article in german to the “the”, would be “die”, that´s why they´ve chosen “die”.

    On the semantic level: we say “a picape” in brazilian portuguese. I do not know why is like this, but, anyway “a” is as feminim as “die”.

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  3. Might be from the origin “die Kutsche”? Modern german would be “der”, like “der Wagen”. If they have been isolated such a long time from the correct mainstream they obviously “see everything throught the distortion lenses of their own culture and habits” and definitely took a wrong turn some time ago regarding cars. Sad. Prost!

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  4. Might be from the origin “die Kutsche”? Modern german would be “der”, like “der Wagen”. If they have been isolated such a long time from the correct mainstream they obviously “see everything throught the distortion lenses of their own culture and habits” and definitely took a wrong turn some time ago regarding cars. Sad. Prost!

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  5. I second Ligia, it sounds closer to English “the”. And if she’s correct, then every noun would take the article “die”, which makes life very simple. It’s like in Dutch where all nouns male or female take the article “de” (except for the neuter which takes “het”).

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  6. I second Ligia, it sounds closer to English “the”. And if she’s correct, then every noun would take the article “die”, which makes life very simple. It’s like in Dutch where all nouns male or female take the article “de” (except for the neuter which takes “het”).

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  7. It makes perfect sense to me, but then again the low German Penn Dutch spoken in this part of Ohio is a mix of Germanic syllables and Appalachian English. Officially, “high German” is spoken only at a religious service. The formal German my 5 year old has to learn at school to accomodate his Amish classmates resembles little or nothing the kiddos hear at home.

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  8. It makes perfect sense to me, but then again the low German Penn Dutch spoken in this part of Ohio is a mix of Germanic syllables and Appalachian English. Officially, “high German” is spoken only at a religious service. The formal German my 5 year old has to learn at school to accomodate his Amish classmates resembles little or nothing the kiddos hear at home.

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  9. It’s der Pick-up according to Duden Fremdwörterbuch, 2., verbesserte und vermehrte Auflage, Mannheim 1966. And you should not grease it, as it’s unnecessary and the lubricant might corrode your records.

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  10. It’s der Pick-up according to Duden Fremdwörterbuch, 2., verbesserte und vermehrte Auflage, Mannheim 1966. And you should not grease it, as it’s unnecessary and the lubricant might corrode your records.

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  11. I believe it’s “der Pick-up” in German, because cars are generally masculine (in spite of “das Cabrio”, “die Limousine”, “die Ente”). If you refer to a car by its brand, you will always say “der Porsche”, “der Citroen” etc.
    Also “Pritschenwagen”, “Kleinlaster” or whatever comes close to pick-up truck would as well be masculine.

    In Tex-German it’s probably feminine, because cars are (like ships) generally female in English. (Of course ships are female in German as well, but for some mysterious reason, cars aren’t.)

    Johannes

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  12. I believe it’s “der Pick-up” in German, because cars are generally masculine (in spite of “das Cabrio”, “die Limousine”, “die Ente”). If you refer to a car by its brand, you will always say “der Porsche”, “der Citroen” etc.
    Also “Pritschenwagen”, “Kleinlaster” or whatever comes close to pick-up truck would as well be masculine.

    In Tex-German it’s probably feminine, because cars are (like ships) generally female in English. (Of course ships are female in German as well, but for some mysterious reason, cars aren’t.)

    Johannes

    Like

  13. Maybe the “die” is not actually of German, but kind of Dutch origin, for Dutch only has “die” (for male and female) and “het” for neuter as determined articles (sorry if this is not the proper grammatikalischer Fachbegriff)

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  14. Maybe the “die” is not actually of German, but kind of Dutch origin, for Dutch only has “die” (for male and female) and “het” for neuter as determined articles (sorry if this is not the proper grammatikalischer Fachbegriff)

    Like

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