German Word of the Week: Paramentik

Paramentik

So I'm wandering around recently when I come across this sign: "Workshop for Evangelical [i.e., Protestant] Paramentik and Textile Objects." Paramentik? Is it a medication? If so, why are people creating it in a workshop? Perhaps it's a kind of theological doctrine. But then, the same question arises: are we to assume that the Protestants first spend an hours working on the doctrine of "paramentics", and then start knitting "textile objects"? I wouldn't put it past them…

Dict.leo.org comes to the rescue, informing us patiently that Paramentik actually means "vestments," of all things. I'm sure the word has some sort of fascinating Greek origin, which my highly cultivated readers will be happy to inform us of. Go to it, Joysters!

12 thoughts on “German Word of the Week: Paramentik

  1. ok. I won´t “waste my latin” (as my grandma used to say) to show something interesting to all G-joysters, but wikipedia´s latin:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parament

    so in portuguese: “paramento” is the noun and them you have the adjective “paramentado”. So if a priest, a guru, a monk or even a witch is wearing his/her vestments and/or carrying his/her tools he/she´s “paramented”.

    So, at one side we have these humble german evangelical students/teachers in a Vestment Workshop. On the other side:

    http://thepope.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/04/18/benedict-fashionisto/

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  2. I have a slightly different interpretation.

    In english ‘paramedic’ are the rescue staff in the ambulance who come to the house to save your life and get you to the hospital.

    So a ‘paramentic’ might be the psychiatric equivalent. Should the pressures of life increase to the point when the butter finally slips of my noodles I expect the paramentics to show up; the men and women in the white coats. Hello Bellview…..

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  3. I have another interpretation too:

    Para = Greek for similar to, but not quite the real thing, differing from the real thing (as in paranormal, paramedicine)

    Mens = Latin for mind

    So “Paramentik” would be something for someone who is sightly out of their mind … ^^

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  4. I have another interpretation too:

    Para = Greek for similar to, but not quite the real thing, differing from the real thing (as in paranormal, paramedicine)

    Mens = Latin for mind

    So “Paramentik” would be something for someone who is sightly out of their mind … ^^

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  5. “So “Paramentik” would be something for someone who is sightly out of their mind”

    Alexandra, I don’t quite get this. Do you mean ‘slightly’ or ‘visibly’?

    If the latter I qualify… 😉

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  6. Hi Alexandra,
    nice combination of Greek and Latin, but unfortunately Ligia is on the right track. “paramentum” has nothing to do with “para” and “mens”. Its derived from “parare”: to prepare, combined with the suffix “-mentum”, which describes an instrument or tool. E.g. “tegere”: to cover, “teg(u/i)mentum”: blanket, cover, roof. The same goes for “ornare” and “ornamentum”.
    Nontheless I like the idea of paramentum as someone being out of his mind a lot better. Maybe that’s the reason for the popes recent blunders…

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  7. Sorry, this is a little off the subject but I can’t help but wondering looking at that sign…why do German churches always seem to use the same font for everything? And was that font specifically designed for the church?

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